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SOLAR HEATER PHILIPPINES

ALSO SEE LATER IN THESE POSTS OTHER DEALER OF SOLAR HEATERS IN THE PHILIPPINES
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LG Develops Solar Panel for E-book Reader

South Korea’s LG Display has developed a solar panel for an e-book reader and plans to commercialize it around 2012.
The panel is 10 centimeters in width and length and has been combined with a Sony Reader electronic book to prove the concept, according to a photo issued by the South Korean company.


A working prototype of the panel and e-book reader will be on show at the International Meeting on Information Display (IMID) than runs this week in Seoul.

The cell is less than a millimeter thick and weighs just 20 grams so won’t significantly increase the weight of an electronic book reader.

E-book readers already offer a long battery life because their electronic paper displays draw power only when the page is being turned so the addition of a solar panel could mean regular readers never have to worry about charging the devices again.

Exposure to sunlight for four or five hours would provide enough power to run the e-book reader for a day, said LG Display.

The solar panel used in the prototype has an efficiency of 9.6 percent and LG is aiming to increase this to 12 percent next year and 14 percent by 2012 at which time it should be read for commercialization.  Read the original article here http://www.pcworld.com/printable/article/id,173459/printable.html
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Make the switch or ban the bulb? Green Philippines

At the recent kick-off of the government’s campaign to make the Philippines incandescent bulb-free by 2010, about 2,000 poor households in Manila’s Tondo district received free energy-saving compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) in exchange for their incandescent bulbs.

About 13 million more CFLs will be distributed nationwide in the coming months under the Philippine Energy Efficiency Project (PEEP), made possible through a loan agreement between the Asian Development Bank and our government.
PEEP also calls for a change in government office buildings and public lighting systems, create a lamp waste management facility, establish an energy service company that will provide financial and technical support to companies planning to reduce energy consumption, and initiate a ‘green building’ rating system.
In addition, ADB is working on a carbon credit purchase agreement with the Philippine government. The program is seen to reduce national carbon dioxide emissions by 300,000 tons a year, allowing the Philippines to receive approximately 300,000 tons of certified emission reduction (carbon market) credits annually.
Undeniable benefits
Incandescent bulbs, in the version that Thomas Edison designed, has been replaced by CFLs in terms of energy efficiency. While there are questions to the luminescence claims of some CFL manufacturers, the savings on fuel costs cannot be denied.
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The country’s “Switch to CFL” campaign, considered the first of its kind in Asia, will save the country P5 billion in fuel costs each year. Each incandescent bulb replaced by a CFL is touted to save as much as P4,000 worth of electricity.
Incandescent bulbs are known to use only 20 percent of the electricity to produce light, while the remaining 80 percent is wasted as heat. In contrast, CFLs use most of their electricity input to produce light. An average incandescent lamp’s life is only about 800 hours, while high-quality CFLs that will be used in the campaign will have a life of 10,000 hours, with a two-year warranty.
Resistance to switching
Even with all the benefits stated above, the switch to CFLs has encountered resistance especially among low-income households because of its higher replacement cost. A 100-watt incandescent bulb would only cost around P20, while a CFL would range from P100 to P200, depending on the wattage.
The modern CFL design has been with the world since the 1973 oil crisis, but only recently had mass manufacturing designs and techniques been able to bring down unit costs to substantially more affordable levels, although still on the high side.
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Because of the CFL’s marked reduction in energy use, the push to implement a ban on incandescent bulb use has been gaining popularity. Europe and Australia have already announced a ban on incandescent in 2010. Canada is also working to ban the bulb next year.
The Philippines has expressed its intention to join the 2010 bandwagon but has yet to demonstrate political will in actually moving forward the proposed initiative.
Health and environment concerns
Not everything is rosy with CFLs though. Environmentalists are critical of the mercury found in it. About 1.5 mg to 5 mg of mercury, a highly toxic pollutant, is found inside the glass tubing. If the glass is broken, environmentalists contend this will make its way in the air and water.
Many countries are still grappling with the issue of CFL disposal, but if this is properly handled, the threat of mercury escaping to the environment could be avoided. Mercury is a known neurotoxin that can cause kidney and brain damage.
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The energy department should start an information campaign on how best to handle used bulbs, even if they estimate the lifespan of those that have been given away – and will be distributed – to go beyond 2015. Read original article herehttp://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=511186&publicationSubCategoryId=66
Where can I buy these energy efficient bulbs?  If your in Cebu check out this blog article to find stores that sell about 5 for 100 pesos  If your not in Cebu or not able to visit, Chinatown in Manila has for cheap prices and in most hardware stores like SM, Robinsons, Ayala have them but at higher prices.

Bargain stores in Cebu city, Colon Street, Philippines

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Solar Power, Without All Those Panels

THE main way for homes to harness solar power today is through bulky panels added to the rooftop or mounted on the ground.
But companies are now offering alternatives to these fixed installations, in the less conspicuous form of shingles, tiles and other building materials that have photovoltaic cells sealed within them.
“The new materials are part of the building itself, not an addition, and they are taking photovoltaics to the next level — an aesthetic one,” said Alfonso Velosa III, a research director at Gartner and co-author of a coming report on the market for the new field, called building-integrated photovoltaics.
Companies are creating solar tiles and shingles in colors and shapes that fit in, for example, with the terra cotta tile roofing popular in the Southwest, or with the gray shingles of coastal saltbox cottages.
SRS Energy of Philadelphia is making curved solar roofing tiles designed to blend in with Southern California’s traditional clay tiles, said Martin R. Low, the chief executive of SRS. A solar tile system that met half the power needs of a typical California home would cost roughly $20,000 to install after rebates, he estimated, or about 10 to 20 percent more than solar panels providing comparable power. http://www.srsenergy.com/Home.aspx
U.S. Tile of Corona, Calif., a maker of clay tiles, will be selling SRS’s Solé Power Tiles, initially in California, and then in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and other states, said Steve Gast, the company’s president. It will be taking orders perhaps as early as November for shipment in January, he said. SRS Energy buys the photovoltaic cells that cover its roofing from United Solar Ovonic, a maker of flexible solar modules that is based in Rochester Hills, Mich. SRS bonds the silicon cells to the curved Solé tiles, which are made of the same basic material as car bumpers, said J. D. Albert, director of engineering at SRS.
The cells have been installed at several demonstration sites, including a home in Bermuda Dunes, Calif. Rather than creating an entire new roof with the solar tiles, the homeowner, Bill Thomas, a roofing contractor, chose to insert them in his existing roof, replacing about 300 square feet of terra cotta tiles; the job took about four hours, he said.
The solar insert in the roof will generate about 2,400 kilowatt hours of electricity a year, enough to cover a quarter to a third of a typical electric bill, Mr. Albert of SRS said. Read the original complete article here.http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/27/business/27novel.html?hpw
THE main way for homes to harness solar power today is through bulky panels added to the rooftop or mounted on the ground.
But companies are now offering alternatives to these fixed installations, in the less conspicuous form of shingles, tiles and other building materials that have photovoltaic cells sealed within them.
“The new materials are part of the building itself, not an addition, and they are taking photovoltaics to the next level — an aesthetic one,” said Alfonso Velosa III, a research director at Gartner and co-author of a coming report on the market for the new field, called building-integrated photovoltaics.
Companies are creating solar tiles and shingles in colors and shapes that fit in, for example, with the terra cotta tile roofing popular in the Southwest, or with the gray shingles of coastal saltbox cottages.
SRS Energy of Philadelphia is making curved solar roofing tiles designed to blend in with Southern California’s traditional clay tiles, said Martin R. Low, the chief executive of SRS. A solar tile system that met half the power needs of a typical California home would cost roughly $20,000 to install after rebates, he estimated, or about 10 to 20 percent more than solar panels providing comparable power.
U.S. Tile of Corona, Calif., a maker of clay tiles, will be selling SRS’s Solé Power Tiles, initially in California, and then in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and other states, said Steve Gast, the company’s president. It will be taking orders perhaps as early as November for shipment in January, he said. SRS Energy buys the photovoltaic cells that cover its roofing from United Solar Ovonic, a maker of flexible solar modules that is based in Rochester Hills, Mich. SRS bonds the silicon cells to the curved Solé tiles, which are made of the same basic material as car bumpers, said J. D. Albert, director of engineering at SRS.
The cells have been installed at several demonstration sites, including a home in Bermuda Dunes, Calif. Rather than creating an entire new roof with the solar tiles, the homeowner, Bill Thomas, a roofing contractor, chose to insert them in his existing roof, replacing about 300 square feet of terra cotta tiles; the job took about four hours, he said.
The solar insert in the roof will generate about 2,400 kilowatt hours of electricity a year, enough to cover a quarter to a third of a typical electric bill, Mr. Albert of SRS said. Read the original complete article herehttp://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/27/business/27novel.html?hpw
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No power bills for this Philippine sun-powered eco-house

No power bills for this Philippine sun-powered eco-house

MANILA, Philippines—At a glance, it looks like any other one-bedroom model house. Inside is no different for within this 53-sq-m abode are the usual household appliances and furniture, including an air-con.
There is some good ideas of those of us who want to go green and save the environment and maybe another Philippine Bargain.
THE ECO-JAO Bahay Kubo employs several technologies that enable its occupants to live “off-grid.”
But there is nothing ordinary about the Eco-Jao Bahay Kubo that was exhibited at the recently concluded Construction Show Manila (ManilaCon) 2009 in Pasay City.
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Its solar panels on the roof power all its lights as well as a number of appliances while solar heaters provide the hot water. It also has a cistern that gathers rain water that could be used for flushing the toilet, washing or watering plants while its walls, floors, frames and posts are made from sustainably harvested and reclaimed wood products.
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“What I would like to prove here is that you don’t need to be rich or famous to be able to afford a sustainable and ecologically friendly house. Who knows, the Eco-Jao Bahay Kubo could be the beginning of a trend that would someday change the way we live here in the Philippines,” said its designer, architect and interior designer James Jao.
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The Eco-Jao Bahay Kubo is so relevant these days especially since electricity is becoming too expensive for middle-income families, he said.
“One should realize that the purchase of electricity is one of the largest sources of carbon dioxide emissions, the gas largely blamed for global warming,” he said.
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Carbon-neutral house
But what is more interesting about the Eco-Jao Bahay Kubo is the fact that this P1.5-million detached unit may be regarded as the Philippines’ first example of a carbon-neutral house—the amount of carbon dioxide it generates daily is offset by its use of conservation techniques and of recyclable / reusable / biodegradable building materials and renewable energy source.
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“The Eco-Jao Bahay Kubo employs several technologies that enable its occupants to live ‘off-grid,’” Jao said.
“Materials like PVC/carbon fiber roofing, thermally insulated walls, large double-glazed, low-emissivity (reflecting solar radiation) windows, light-colored interior and high ceiling work together to cool the house during hot and humid days,” he said.
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What would these innovations mean to an average middle-income family?
“Just like in car racing, the goal is to achieve the top performance that the household members get from a house. This involves lowering a family’s energy expenses—from cooking, lighting, cooling and running different sorts of appliances—without sacrificing life’s comforts,” Jao said.
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Mission
Since he completed his bachelor’s degree in architecture at the University of Santo Tomas and master’s degree in city design and social science at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Jao has promised himself to one day help every middle-income family live in an ecologically sound home.
“It’s not very easy to do this initially since not many see the significance of sustainable living. Also, the materials I was seeking were still too expensive or not yet available here in the local market,” Jao said.
Last year, Jao teamed up with LA Ducut and Co., the organizers of ManilaCon, and was able to build and display his first eco-house—named LuzViMinda—during an exhibit at the SMX Convention Center in Pasay City.
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“Considering our group’s advocacy for green and sustainable building, Jao’s eco-house exemplifies what we are campaigning for years through our yearly exhibit,” said Lilibeth Ducut-Abais, managing director of LA Ducut and Co.
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Abais said that after the exhibit last year, the 121-sq-m LuzViMinda was disassembled and transported to Bulusan, Sorsogon, where it was rebuilt for its new balikbayan owner.
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Innovative products
“Since then, so many innovative products have become available locally and [these were] incorporated in this year’s version of the eco-house,” Jao said.
He described the Eco-Jao Bahay Kubo as a modern example of Filipino architecture, featuring a shaded veranda that helps keep natural air to freely circulate and allow sunlight to easily penetrate the house’s interior.
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“Apart from the comforts that one may be able to enjoy, the owner of this type of eco-house would be able to recoup his investment in just five years,” Jao said.
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He said a developer or home builder constructing say, six to 12 units, could lower the cost of each unit since the developer may be able to build a single energy source that could be shared.
He said he was fortunate to be part of the annually held ManilaCon, as he was able to impart his concept to a wider audience.
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Solar panels in the philippines? Where can I find?

Note the article above this posting on a innovative energy efficient “green” house built here in Manila.
Where can I buy/order a small solar panel in the Philippines ?
Tingnan ang buong laki ng larawan
http://www.sophilcor.com/ is a Philippine source for solar products
Sulit has several dealers listed too in classified
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A friend from Greenpeace gave me the contact number of their Climate and Energy Campaigner who can give you the details on where to get a solar panel. Please call Abby Jabines at 0917-8864767.
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Their office has a basic solar panel set-up that can power everything except A/Cs and refrigerators, I think. Since I cannot afford it, I’m doing the Greenpeace “Take action” campaign (http://www.greenpeace.org/international/campaigns/climate-change/take_action) na lang
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There are solar powered airconditioners (
) and refrigerators available from China. They use the sun’s heat to drive the cooling cycle, and very little electricity to drive the cooling fans. EERs from 21 to 30 are common in these devices (regular aircons do 8-12 EER).
If you’re going to use solar power, it makes sense to switch some parts of your home wiring to 12V electrical systems instead of using an inefficient inverter. LCD monitors, non-laser printers, network hubs, can all run off twelve volts. There are 12V CFLs for general lighting as well as 12V ballasts for regular flourescent lamps.
Solar power’s best use is as a source of power in off-grid areas.  regarding the inverter, on the tecnical point of view what does it do?
the Inverter converts 12V/24V DC electric power from batteries to 110/220V AC power. It only converts around 80% of the energy, with the rest lost as heat. Hence, it makes sense to avoid using 220V appliances on a 12V solar system (easy to do, since modern technology runs well on 12V)
In the many trade shows that I’ve attended, I noticed that Shell Philippines also has a demo unit that they’re sellng. It will enable you to power several light bulbs, a tv, a couple of elec fan, or just what you might call a basic barrio house electricity requirement. If you want to upgrade, you add more solar panels, and batteries.
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Try calling the United Architects of the Philippines-Green Architecture Movement
Address: 53 Scout Rallos Street, Quezon City, Metro Manila, 1103, Philippines
Tel: (+63) 2 – 412 63 64 / Fax: (+63) 2 – 372 17 96. GAM advocates the use of alternative energy sources, and encourages the use of solar energy to those who are open to the idea (and have extra cash to spare). I can PM you a contact from GAM if you need it.
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Go green (energy saving) in your house, room by room

Living room
How to green your home? Let’s start in the living room as electronics are sucking up more and more juice–as much as 15 or 20 percent of people’s bills.


Low effort: Slay the vampire, or parasitic, load in your home by using power strips. Connect your computer or entertainment center gear to a power strip and flick the power strip off when you’re done. A more high-tech approach is a “smart” power strip like this one by Bits. You plug your TV or computer into the Control Outlet (in blue) and peripheral devices like printers to the Automatically Switched outlets. When you turn the TV or PC off, the standby power for the peripherals gets cut automatically.

Medium: Do your homework before upgrading your TV, game player, etc. and make energy efficiency one of your top buying priorities. CNET rates products on energy consumption now and Greenpeace rates individual consumer electronics manufacturers on everything from toxic material to greenhouse gas reporting. Flat-screen TVs, in particular, can create a big jump in energy use if you don’t choose with efficiency in mind.

High: Install a home-area network from a company like iControl which integrates home energy management with home entertainment.

Kitchen
Now apply the same thinking for reducing energy consumption from consumer electronics to the kitchen.

Low effort: Put a lid on a pot of water set to boil. Freeze food and use a microwave to heat it, which uses less energy than cooking from scratch.
Medium: Buy EnergyStar-rated white goods. Since its inception in 1991, the program has saved 100 terawatt-hours of electricity, or 2.5 percent of total U.S. electricity consumption in a year. In the no-brainer category.

High: If you want to get fancy with your appliances, look into what GE is doing. These “kitchen of the future” appliances, expected for release next year, will be clever enough to respond to a signal from a smart meter to take go into conservation mode or take advantage of off-peak rates. Whirlpool recently announced that it, too, produce one million “smart-grid compatible” clothes dryers by 2011.

Dining room
Artificial lighting can account for 15 percent of a home’s electricity use. LEDs promise long life and low power, but there’s a lot to do before LED prices come down to earth.
Low effort: Install (more) compact fluorescent bulbs. In terms of light quality, you can get a range of colors–check the “K rating” or Kelvin rating. Yes, they do contain small amounts of mercury so you should recycle them with hazardous trash or return them to retail stores like Home Depot that recycle them.

Medium: Open the shades. Managing natural lighting can cut your artificial lighting (and cooling) needs significantly. If you’re really hungry for the beneficial effects of “daylighting,” consider getting an appliance, such as a Solatube, which pipes light in from the roof.
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-High: The most high-effort, high-tech approach to lighting is LED lamps. Because of the higher upfront cost, most LED lights are used in commercial spaces where one can take advantage of the different colors LEDs offer. But if price is no object, LED lighting can turn your basement TV room into a fancy home entertainment center or, as this homeowner did, give your dining room some classy ambiance.

Attic
This is where you can cut your heating and cooling bills significantly. The city of Austin, Texas, which has mandated home energy audits, found that almost 90 percent of the 400 homes audited needed both additional attic insulation and repairs to their leaky ducts.

Low effort: Get an energy audit and help snoop out the places where air from conditioned space (where you live) seeps into your attic, crawl spaces, basement, etc. To find an energy auditor, go to efficiencyfirst.org. There are subsidized weatherizing services for low-income people as well.
Medium: Add more insulation to your attic (and walls). Most homes could use more. Homes in the U.S. should have between R-30 and R-60 insulation. This attic was sprayed with Icenyne foam on the rafters, which provides both insulation and seals the air. The DOE’s office of energy efficiency offers a map on what you should have for your climate.

High: Get a comprehensive audit with a blower door test and infrared camera. An audit can cost $500 or $600, but it will help locate air leaks around the house, which is important to do before insulating. Cellulose or fiberglass insulation doesn’t stop air flow, it just keeps heat in. To fill those air cracks, learn how to use a caulk gun and canned foam.

Basement
Heating and cooling is where the bulk of most household’s energy budget goes, so the basement is the location of your home’s biggest carbon footprint. The clothes dryer and the hot water heater, often in people’s basements, are typically among the biggest energy consuming appliances.
Low effort: Clean out the vent on your clothes dryer with a brush. Insulate hot water pipes and put an insulating blanket around your hot water heater. Set the hot water heater to 120 degrees and, if it’s electric, put it on a timer
Medium: If you have central air, have it maintained (filters cleaned, etc.) so it will run more efficiently. Use fans (although only when people are in the room) and ventilation, such as opening windows during the cool times of the day. Also in the low-tech department is hanging your clothes to dry.
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-High: You can supplement or replace your heating or cooling with a range of more efficient products, such as efficient space heaters or evaporative coolers in certain climates. The DOE again offers a good explanation of your options. Heat pumps, such as ground-source heat pumps or geothermal systems, seem to catch on a bit more every year as a very efficient way to heat and cool buildings.

Home office
With many people working at home, the home office is a significant consumer of energy both for electricity and space heating/cooling. It’s no wonder when you look at the rat’s nest of wiring in home offices.

Low effort: Set your computer’s power management system at home and at work. Recycle your old electronics gear. See this map to find a recycler.
Medium: Use a laptop instead of a desktop PC. Put things that don’t need to have standby power (computer speakers, etc.) on a power strip and click it off when not using. Unplug all those chargers–for the phone, iPod, Blackberry, etc.–when not in use.
High: In addition to buying an energy-efficient PC or other electronics, consider adding other green attributes to your list, such as whether the product can be recycled and the amount of toxins used inside.

Bathroom/water
The goals here are to reduce water consumption and to lower the amount of energy needed to heat water, which can be up to 25 percent of a home’s energy use.
Low effort: Put an aerator on your bathroom sink–for 50 cents, you’ll make your money back quickly on lower water consumption. Then, get a low-flow shower head, which save between 20 percent and 60 percent water. Fix those leaks.
Medium: Consider getting an on-demand (also called tankless) hot water heating. In some cases, you can have an electric on-demand water heater placed directly in the bathroom and other places in the home that need hot water.

High: Get a solar hot water system, either flat panel (left on this photo) or evacuated tubes. While solar electric (photovoltaics) cost about $25,000, you can get a solar hot water system for $10,000 or less. These systems have been around for decades (remember Jimmy Carter) but are more reliable and efficient than the 1970s variety. Original posting with photos is located here http://news.cnet.com/2300-11128_3-10001322-7.html?tag=mncol
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DOE launches energy-efficiency project

AMID typhoon Ondoy’s onslaught on Metro Manila, the Department of Energy (DOE) pushed through on Saturday with the launch of its Switch to Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) program under its Philippine Energy Efficiency Project (PEEP).
Tingnan ang buong laki ng larawan
Held at the Don Bosco Youth Center in Tondo, Manila, President Arroyo and Energy Secretary Angelo Reyes, along with its partner nongovernment organizations and religious groups, handed CFLs to some 2,000 households in Tondo—the early adapters to the project.
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Reyes said the shift to CFLs could help reduce the peak demand for power by 450 megaWatts. “Reducing the peak demand eases the need to import energy sources by as much as $120 million every year,” he added.
Among the other benefits, Reyes said the use of five 15-Watt CFLs will result in monthly savings of P58.50, as compared with spending P270 for using five 60-Watt incandescent bulbs.
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With about P210 saved from using CFLs, Reyes said money could be used to buy 8 to 10 kilos of rice or to pay water bills.
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The Switch to CFLs, which is under the DOE’s PEEP, is financed through a $30-million loan from the Asian Development Bank (ADB).
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The Switch to CFLs program is the first of its kind in Asia, where 13 million CFLs will be distributed all over the country in the coming months, as part of a larger drive to make the Philippines incandescent bulb-free by 2010.
ADB said that for each light bulb replaced, families can expect savings of as much as P4,000 on their electricity bills over the 10-year life span of the CFLs.
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“This groundbreaking campaign will not only save families’ money. It will also save the Philippines $100 million in fuel costs each year or around $1 billion over the coming decade,” Reyes said.
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Incandescent bulbs are inefficient with only 20 percent of the electricity used to produce light; the remaining 80 percent is wasted as heat. In contrast, CFLs use most of their electricity input to produce light.
While an average incandescent bulb’s life is only about 800 hours, CFLs used in the program have a lifespan of 10,000 hours with a two-year warranty.
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Reyes also noted that the program will help reduce carbon emissions by 300,000 tons every year, which will allow the country to earn about 300,000 tons of certified emission-reduction credits annually—which is another boost to the country’s coffers.
“This project shows how Filipinos and the world can benefit through such investments—making the Philippines the first country in Asia to access carbon credits from a program like this,” said Neeraj Jain, ADB country director for the Philippine country office.
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-The PEEP, which includes the CFL-replacement program, is made possible through a loan agreement between ADB and the Philippine government. In addition, ADB is also working on a carbon-credit purchase agreement with the Philippine government.
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The project will also retrofit government office buildings and public lighting systems with other efficient lighting options, create a lamp waste- management facility, establish an energy-service company that will provide financial and technical support to companies planning to reduce energy consumption, and initiate a “green building” rating system.
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“[Around] 18 nongovernment organizations and church groups have come together to support this initiative because we believe that each one of us can be a part of the solution to present-day climate change and energy challenges,” said Cates Maceda, co-convener of the Switch movement. “Switching to CFLs is one simple yet concrete step that can generate long-term benefits for the country.”
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Apart from the PEEP, ADB is also working on a carbon-credit purchase agreement with the Philippine government.
ADB, based in Manila, is dedicated to reducing poverty in the Asia-Pacific region through inclusive economic growth, environmentally sustainable growth, and regional integration.
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Established in 1966, it is owned by 67 members—48 from the region. In 2008 it approved $10.5 billion worth of loans, $811.4 million worth of grant projects, and technical assistance amounting to $274.5 million. (With C. Ordinario)   Read the original article here
Where can I buy these energy efficient bulbs?  If your in Cebu check out this blog article to find stores that sell about 5 for 100 pesos  If your not in Cebu or not able to visit, Chinatown in Manila has for cheap prices and in most hardware stores like SM, Robinsons, Ayala have them but at higher prices.

Bargain stores in Cebu city, Colon Street, Philippines